Trump in Freefall as Disapproval Rate and Support for Impeachment Soar

Published on
by

‘Support for impeaching Trump has crept up from 35 percent two weeks ago, to 40 percent last week, to its 46 percent standing this week’

President Donald Trump’s contentious interactions with foreign leaders are among the factors contributing to people’s skepticism. (Photo: Tom Lohdan/flickr/cc)

Two new polls reflect poorly on President Donald Trump’s brief tenure in the Oval Office, with one showing his administration is tarnishing Americans’ view of U.S. popularity around the world, and another finding voters are already evenly divided on the issue of impeaching the president.

The Gallup poll released Friday finds Americans believe the world at-large sees the U.S. more unfavorably (57 percent) than favorably (42 percent)—the worst assessment of the country’s image in almost 10 years. “The 42 percent favorable rating is one of the lowest since Gallup began asking this question in 2000 and may be attributable to the election of Trump, whose sometimes controversial statements and actions have rankled several world leaders,” the polling outfit wrote.

(Credit: Gallup)(Credit: Gallup)

According to the same survey, fewer than three in 10 Americans (29 percent) say leaders of other countries have respect for the new president, with 67 percent saying world leaders do not have much respect for him. This is a sharp turnaround from how people perceived the prior two presidents. The Gallup poll was conducted February 1-5 with a margin of error of +/- 4 percentage points.

(Credit: Gallup)(Credit: Gallup)

Support for Impeachment Soars

Meanwhile, a Public Policy Polling (PPP) survey also released Friday finds that Trump’s popularity as president has “declined precipitously just over the last two weeks.”

The first PPP poll of Trump’s presidency in late January found voters were evenly divided on Trump, with 44 percent approving of him and 44 percent disapproving. Now, his approval rating is 43 percent, while his disapproval has gone all the way up to 53 percent.

What’s more, the poll shows 46 percent in favor of impeaching Trump and 46 percent opposed. According to PPP, “Support for impeaching Trump has crept up from 35 percent two weeks ago, to 40 percent last week, to its 46 percent standing this week.”

While Hillary Clinton voters initially only supported Trump’s impeachment 65% to 14%, after seeing him in office over the last few weeks that’s gone up already to 83% to 6%.

The agency identifies several reasons for Trump’s troubles, as per conversations with voters:

Respondents also told PPP that the television program “Saturday Night Live” has more credibility than Trump (48-43 percent, with 10 percent “not sure”).

“Finally,” PPP writes, “we continue to find that unhappiness with Trump—and with Congressional Republicans—could help Democrats to make big gains in 2018. Democrats lead 49/41 on the generic Congressional ballot. That’s partially a product of Trump’s unpopularity but also an outgrowth of [House Speaker] Paul Ryan (35/47 approval), [Senate Majority Leader] Mitch McConnell (23/52 approval), and Congress as a whole (16/68 approval) being unpopular in their own rights.”

The PPP survey was conducted February 7-8, with a margin of error of +/- 3.7 percentage points.

Share This Article


Published on
by

Plans for Nationwide Anti-Trump Tax Day Protests Gain Momentum

While President Donald Trump insists people “don’t care” about his tax returns, marches nationwide on April 15 will demonstrate otherwise

"The Tax March will demonstrate the intensity of the public's demands for answers about just what it is that Donald Trump is so determined to hide." (Image: Tax March)“The Tax March will demonstrate the intensity of the public’s demands for answers about just what it is that Donald Trump is so determined to hide.” (Image: Tax March)

From New York to Los Angeles and Washington, D.C. to Little Rock, Arkansas, protesters will take to the streets on Saturday, April 15 to show President Donald Trump that the American public does, in fact, care about his tax returns.

Trump and his associates have repeatedly claimed that people “don’t care” about the returns—a claim that has been disproved multiple times over. On April 15, the demonstration of interest will be hard to miss, with marches and rallies planned to take place in the nation’s capitol and 60 additional cities nationwide.

As Common Dreams reported, the idea grew out of a collection of tweets in the wake of January’s global women’s marches.

“It’s fitting that at least one Trump-related march started out as a series of angry tweets,” Frank Lesser, a comedy writer who was among the first to post about the protest idea, said in an emailed statement to the Huffington Post.

Now, Politico reports:

Leaders from January’s women’s marches are joining with a constellation of liberal groups, including MoveOn.org, the American Federation of Teachers, and Our Revolution—the organization built from the skeleton of Bernie Sanders’ presidential campaign—to bring together marchers to walk from the U.S. Capitol to the White House, passing both Trump’s hotel and the IRS building.

Other groups reportedly helping organize the April 15 protest include the Indivisible Project, Americans For Tax Fairness, and the Center for Popular Democracy.

“Until we see his taxes, we don’t know how much money he owes Russia, China, and other countries,” MoveOn.org Washington director Ben Wikler told Politico. “If Trump won’t voluntarily release his taxes, Congress must force him to do it, as a matter of moral urgency, constitutional necessity, and national security.”

“The Tax March will demonstrate the intensity of the public’s demands for answers about just what it is that Donald Trump is so determined to hide,” Wikler said, “while highlighting the profound inequality encoded in our rigged tax system—which Trump has exploited for years, and which would only be made worse by his policies.”

The Tax March website lists many other local marches happening in more than two dozen states.

“On the campaign trail, Donald Trump lied by saying he would release his tax returns upon the completion of the IRS audit,” said Brian Eisold, rally organizer for the Milwaukee Tax Day event. “We the People of Milwaukee intend to hold him accountable in the name of transparency and good governance.”

Just this week, Republicans blocked an attempt by Democratic members of Congress to obtain Trump’s tax records.

Watch for developments under the hashtag #TaxMarch:

Share This Article


Published on
by

Trump to Appoint Billionaire Know-Nothing to Root Out ‘Low-Life Leakers’

Quoting unnamed officials, New York Times reports that billionaire with no intelligence experience to conduct sweeping review of agencies

President Donald Trump's opinion of leaks has shifted dramatically since his days on the campaign trail when he declared, "I love WikiLeaks." (Photo: Alex Wong/Getty)

President Donald Trump’s opinion of leaks has shifted dramatically since his days on the campaign trail when he declared, “I love WikiLeaks.” (Photo: Alex Wong/Getty)

Tensions between the U.S. intelligence community and President Donald Trump reached new heights after it was reported that Trump ally and New York billionaire Stephen Feinberg would be leading a sweeping review of the nation’s spy agencies.

Citing administration officials, the New York Times reported Wednesday that Feinberg, whose “only experience with national security matters is his [capital management] firm’s stakes in a private security company and two gun makers,” would be working for the White House while conducting a broad review of intelligence agencies. Feinberg is co-founder of Cerberus Capital Management.

“Bringing Mr. Feinberg into the administration to conduct the review is seen as a way of injecting a Trump loyalist into a world the White House views with suspicion,” the Timesobserved, noting that Feinberg has close ties to Trump’s controversial chief strategist Stephen Bannon as well as son-in-law Jared Kushner.

What’s more, “top intelligence officials fear that Mr. Feinberg is being groomed for a high position in one of the intelligence agencies,” posts which are normally reserved for career intelligence officials, the Times further noted.

Trump’s growing public feud with the U.S. intelligence agencies peaked this week after leaks revealed that the White House had known about unsanctioned pre-inaugural communications between Gen. Michael Flynn and Russian officials, forcing the resignation of Flynn from his post as national security advisor.

And while calls have grown for an independent investigation into potential collusion between the Kremlin and the Trump camp, the president has focused his wrath on the “low-life leakers,” as he wrote on Twitter early Thursday, vowing: “They will be caught!”

As many have pointed out, Trump’s opinion of such leaks has shifted dramatically since his days on the campaign trail when he declared, “I love WikiLeaks,” after the outlet published emails hacked from the account of John Podesta, campaign manager for Trump’s political rival Hillary Clinton.

“But this is Washington,” the Times‘ Michael D. Shear observed in a separate story on Wednesday, “where leaks are common currency—and, depending what side you’re on, either sinister or patriotic.

“Democrats these days see the proliferation of leaks about the Trump administration as the acts of public servants revealing the misdeeds of a presidency,” Shear continued. “Republicans see them as the reckless actions of disgruntled bureaucrats eager to advance their own agendas and sabotage Mr. Trump. Either way, Mr. Trump’s presidential flip-flop follows a landmark month for Washington leaks.”

Share This Article

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s