Daughters of Argentine Dirty War Perpetrators March for Justice

  • Liliana Furio, family member of a person guilty of genocide, poses during a march against gender violence in Buenos Aires, June 3, 2017.

    Liliana Furio, family member of a person guilty of genocide, poses during a march against gender violence in Buenos Aires, June 3, 2017. | Photo: AFP

Published 4 June 2017
The women, between 40 and 60 years old, decided to take part in the massive march against femicides known as #NiUnaMenos.

Argentine women whose fathers were condemned for human rights abuses during the Dirty War (1974-1983) marched for the first time in the country’s history to defend “memory, truth and justice,” along with the national march against gender violence Saturday.

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“Histories of disobedience. 30,000 reasons. Sons and daughters of people responsible for genocide support memory, truth and justice,” read a banner held by a group of seven women in the middle of the crowd.

The women, between 40 and 60 years old, decided to take part in the massive march against femicides known as #NiUnaMenos, or #NotOne More in English, as the first public appearance of their recently-created organization.

“They are very brave. As much for their personal history than their awareness of the genocide,” Martina Mirabelles, a teacher, who applauded the women according to AFP.

Patricia Isasa, who was tortured and raped in three concentration camps when she was 16 years old, called “historical” the “huge efforts” of daughters of torturers against their fathers and the patriarchal society. “They are all victims of these cruel men,” she said.

Erika Lederer is the daughter of Ricardo, an obstetrician who participated in the coup against Salvador Allende and headed the illegal maternity unit of a military hospital at Campo de Mayo, stealing the prisoners’ babies. He killed himself when an investigation was opened against him.

His daughter said she suspected what her father was doing since she was a child, asking him “uneasy questions.” She became a lawyer because her father prohibited her from studying philosophy as she wanted, arguing it was for “lefties.”

“At home, there was a lot of domestic violence, to the point that I’d think: if he can do this to me, he can do even worse to unknown people,” she recalled, mentioning her “solitude” as well as the “shame” she could not share with anyone else.

She used to ask her father if he regretted anything, but he never admitted any wrongdoing, she added.

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‘I Don’t Regret Expelling the DEA from Bolivia’: Evo Morales

  • Bolivia

    Bolivia’s President Evo Morales. | Photo: Prensa Latina

Published 4 June 2017 (9 hours 29 minutes ago)
Two years after his election in 2006, Morales ordered the closing of the DEA’s office in La Paz and the U.S. military base in Chimore.

President Evo Morales recalled today that the expulsion of the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency and the U.S. military base allowed Bolivia to recover economic and political sovereignty.

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“I do not regret the decision about the DEA and the military base,” the president said in a public ceremony marking the 47th anniversary of the municipality of Villa Tunari, in the central region of Cochabamba.

He criticized the repression of the U.S. agents against Bolivian campesinos under the pretext of the war on drugs, “The United States used the war on drugs in order to control the country’s politics and loot our natural resources,” he said, emphasizing the importance of having recovered national independence, thanks to the struggle of the people.

“Now we have a new Bolivia. That is a result of the unity of the people,” he said, recalling other public policies implemented during his administration, such as the nationalization of hydrocarbons and strategic companies as well the redistribution of wealth.

Such policies seem to have paid off, as Bolivia has become the country with the highest Gross Domestic Product growth throughout South America, from the GDP US$5 billion, to US$34 billion in 2015.

“Our Revolution has united the countryside and the cities, the east with the west,” the Bolivian president explained in his speech in Villa Tunari.

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