The major opinion polling company Gallup has admitted on its own website that its three decades long polling data on supposed American sympathy for Israel against the Palestinians contains “fundamental flaws well beyond what we would attribute to normal sampling error”

Gallup Admits its “Israeli vs. Palestinian Sympathy Polls” are False and Distorted—in Jews’ Favor

The major opinion polling company Gallup has admitted on its own website that its three decades long polling data on supposed American sympathy for Israel against the Palestinians contains “fundamental flaws well beyond what we would attribute to normal sampling error”—in other words, that they are false and have been distorted in favor of the Jews.

 

 

The admission is contained in a Gallup article titled “Survey Context Effects on Middle East Sympathies,” published on March 28, 2019.

The article was given no publicity in the Jewish-controlled legacy media, and has only come to the attention of the public thanks to an article on it written by Grant F. Smith, the tireless campaigner and director of the Institute for Research: Middle Eastern Policy in Washington DC.

As Smith wrote, “Gallup’s admission centers on its high-stakes question of whether Americans have greater sympathy for Israelis or for Palestinians, and that Gallup [has] loudly trumpeted that Americans ‘increasingly sympathized with Israel in recent years.’”

These polls, Smith points out, have been used by “U.S. based Israel affinity organizations” [that is, the Jewish lobby which controls Congress] and the Congressional Research Service “to claim that most Americans support giving most of the US foreign aid budget to Israel.”

In its article, Gallup attributes its sudden admission of error to “an analysis of [Gallup] World Affairs surveys and other surveys conducted at about the same time indicate this is not the case.”

Smith said that Gallup’s reevaluation may have been triggered by more than its own polling and cited polling done by CNN and Pew Research.

“In both 2018 and 2019 IRmep paid to field Gallup’s precisely worded polling question through the highly accurate Google Surveys representative polling service. The analysis of results, found that contrary to Gallup results the majority of Americans do not sympathize more with Israelis ‘in the Middle East situation.’”





Gallup now claims its polling showing consistently high American sympathy for Israel is the result of including the question within multi-question surveys in which prior questions about world affairs influenced the response to subsequent questions.

Gallup claims, “…the priming effect of asking country favorability appears to push people toward sympathizing with Israel rather than expressing no opinion (or not taking a side). The theory is that after respondents answer some questions on international affairs, they may become more focused on the topic and more comfortable expressing opinions (including weakly held ones) in response to subsequent questions on that same topic.”

Gallup claims it tested that theory and verified internally that the majority of Americans do not sympathize with Israel in an unpublished Gallup polling “experiment” conducted February 12-28.

“Unfortunately for Gallup, its quiet admission raises more questions than it answers. Why is the organization admitting flawed polling only in a back-page web article with an overly technical title, “Survey Context Effects on Middle East Sympathies” sure to be ignored by polling stakeholders and the mainstream media?” Smith asked.

“Why didn’t Gallup qualify its March 6 poll report, ‘Americans, but Not Liberal Democrats, Mostly Pro-Israel’ reporting February 1-10 World Affairs results with a footnote that it may have reflected ‘weakly held’ views, and offering its February 12-28 results?

“Why is Gallup still touting telephone-based survey results when online and smartphone polling is consistently providing more accurate results?,” Smith aksed.


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.